Are Sports Ready to Leave TV Broadcasting Behind?

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All things entertainment and moving online for a whole host of reasons – a lower cost to the consumer through monthly subscriptions makes things like music, movies and TV more accessible, and other forms of entertainment like gaming have thrived with a mobile adjustment including those that link to sporting as those looking to bet with bet365 on their favorite sports can do so from their handheld device. 

As a whole, however, the sporting industry has been slower to make the adjustment as many still rely on their existing TV broadcasting deals and have many games, leagues, or entire sports locked behind a TV subscription paywall that doesn’t have the best track record for offering alternatives, but are major sporting options ready to make the change to online streaming instead?

For bigger sports like soccer, there have been partnerships with the likes of Amazon to bring a small number of games from the UK Premier League to the prime platform, but with how big some other alternatives like BT Sport are and how established their hold is over the sport, it’s not likely to see major change just yet, but as television usage continues to fall, it may force the hand – particularly in soccer, however, broadcasting deals are valued up in the billions of dollars, so making change will only come when necessary. 

Other sports such as Formula 1 have already made the change with their own F1TV – whilst still regularly shown through broadcasters like Sky Sports with exclusive deals, a full subscription to F1TV offers unique points of view from the drivers, lots of other data, and access to past races too. There have been some hiccups along the way, though, as F1TV hasn’t always been known for delivering the best quality and has had issues with performance along the way too leading some viewers to sites off the beaten path, but a refocus has led to some small improvements over time. 

Examples include the 2022 Super Bowl which saw a new variety of different streaming services become accessible for audiences around the world, but still remained quite limited as those overseas would still have to rely on rebroadcasts or similarly grey sites to view the content, much to the dismay of those who are still hoping to find new viewing opportunities. 

Whilst the looming contracts still exist, change will come slowly, but many are set to expire within  the next couple of years and will lead to a period of time where different decisions may need to be made – whether stepping away from the traditional TV deals and exploring either existing streaming platforms or making one more dedicated to the specific sport, or renewing what’s already in place – given there are billions of dollars on the line for these deals, however, change may still be slower and not all sports will be ready to leave TV broadcasting and the lucrative deals behind.

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